Fridge Clean Out and Julie & Julia

A generous portion of oats in another new Ikea bowl. The perfect breakfast for yesterday’s cool and gray weather.

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The blackberries are huge, and they match the bowl.

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For lunch, I made a green monster with peach, spinach, soy yogurt, almond milk, and chia seeds. Accompanied by a slice of bread with white chocolate peanut butter. Too good.

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The last time that I drank coconut water, I tried it after my run in order to rehydrate. Yesterday, I gulped it down before my run. I also tried a different brand– Vita Coco–and a different flavor–pineapple. The pineapple flavor is good but too sweet. There was also some funny residue that I could not get to mix well. I have a problem with things floating in my liquids, unless I am drinking a smoothie.

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The before run result? I had tons of energy during my 3.5 mile run and did not get a headache. Yesterday James went to Fairway and picked up some big cartons of coconut water, so I will be all stocked up.

Speaking of Fairway, our fridge will explode if we try to stuff anything else inside of it. Yes, it is possible for a vegan fridge to look like this!

Top shelf:

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Middle shelf:

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Bottom shelf:

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The two bottom drawers:

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The side door:

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So, I think that it is time for a challenge. James and I love grocery shopping, and we sometimes get a little bit carried away. Can you help me think of guidelines for a fridge clean out challenge? I want to clean out our fridge before we are allowed to make another trip to the grocery store. However, there need to be obvious limitations–if we run out of produce, we will need to restock, especially on items that I use daily such as spinach. Some of the stuff on the door (mustard, salad dressing) will last forever, so I will need to make some sort of trip before that stuff runs out, otherwise we will be eating bowls of mustard for breakfast. Maybe we should make sure we aren’t tempted into buying individual products until we run out of them. Any ideas/comments/concerns/suggestions?

Okay, on to dinner last night. Look what new tofu creation Nasoya came up with:

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I know, I know, it is very easy to cube your own tofu. But, what about those nights when you are completely exhausted, and the thought of an extra 3 minutes slicing tofu (along with the extra dishes of a cutting board and knife) is just unbearable? Whatever, I thought I’d try it out. I put the tofu cubes into a frying pan with olive oil, soy sauce, and nutritional yeast. Simple and tasty. Then I arranged it on top of a bed of arugula and red and green lettuce with dried cranberries.

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Topped with a conservative amount of Thai Lime salad dressing. Not that I have had chicken salad in oh probably 10 years, but this reminded me of what I would expect chicken salad to taste like.

Also split a Sam Adam’s Honey Porter with James:

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This is a smooth skinned avocado that James ate for dessert.

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I tried a small scoop–It is watery and bland, blech.

Tonight we are having friends over for dinner, and I have quite the vegan menu prepared. Look for pictures and a recap either tonight or tomorrow morning.

Finally, If you haven’t seen Julie & Julia yet, you must. Maryl Streep plays a very convincing Julia Child, and one half of the story chronicles her adventures in learning french cooking, and her journey to create her collaborative cookbook, Mastering The Art of French Cooking. The second half of the story is about a run-down, stuck-in-a-rut government worker/aspiring writer who challenges herself to cook every recipe in Julia’s book within one year… oh, and blog about it. The movie is based on a true story, and at the risk of sounding uncharacteristically cheesy and clichĂ©, it is funny, heart warming, and inspiring. Most people will agree that the Julia story was brilliant, but the Julie story has gotten some bad reviews. However, Julia’s goal was to change the way Americans approach cooking, or more “simply” to change the world. Keeping this in mind, Julie’s comparatively less impressive story on one level serves to confirm, in an obsessive way, the real and ongoing impact of Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Read this review by A. O. Scott in the NY Times.

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2 responses to “Fridge Clean Out and Julie & Julia

  1. your vegan fridge looks like mine.. thanks for sharing about Julie and Julia. I read the book and I loved it, right now I am reading My Life in France.

  2. Pingback: General Tsao’s Tempeh « Lost in the Neon Fruit Supermarket

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